Archive for Police

National Teen Driver Safety Week

Talk to Your Teen about the Importance of Driving Safety During National Teen Driver Safety Week
Carlisle, Iowa — Parenting is no easy task, and parenting teenagers comes with its own unique set of challenges. During National Teen Driver Safety Week October 18-24, 2020. This coming week is a perfect time to begin — and continue — this conversation, and to remind parents not to hand over the car keys until their teen knows the rules of the road.
Motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of death for teens 15 to 18 years old in the United States.
In 2018, there were 2,121 people killed in crashes involving a teen passenger vehicle driver (15-18 years old), of which 719 deaths were the teen driver — a 5% decrease from 2017. In fact, in 2018, there were an estimated 88,000 teen drivers injured in motor vehicle traffic crashes, and an estimated 256,000 people injured in crashes involving a teen driver, accounting for almost 10% of all those injured that year.
Parents play an important role in helping ensure their teen drivers take smart steps to stay safe on the road. NHTSA gives parents tips on how to talk about safe driving behaviors with their teens, and to address the most dangerous and deadly driving behaviors for teen drivers: alcohol, lack of seat belt use, distracted driving, speeding, and driving with passengers.
NHTSA’s website, www.nhtsa.gov/road-safety/teen-driving, has detailed information and statistics on teen driving, and outlines the basic rules parents can use to help reduce the risks for teen drivers:
1. Impaired Driving: All teens are too young to legally buy, possess, or consume alcohol. However, nationally, 16% of teen drivers involved in fatal crashes in 2018 had alcohol in their system. But alcohol isn’t the only substance that can keep your teen from driving safely: Like other drugs, marijuana affects a driver’s ability to react to their surroundings. Driving is a complex task, and marijuana slows reaction time, affecting a driver’s ability to drive safely. Remind your teen that driving under the influence of any impairing substance — including illicit or prescription drugs, or over-the-counter medication — could have deadly consequences.
2. Seat Belt Safety: Wearing a seat belt is one of the simplest ways for teens to stay safe in a vehicle. Yet too many teens aren’t buckling up. In 2018, almost half (45%) of the teen passenger vehicle drivers who died were unbuckled. Even more troubling, when the teen driver involved in the fatal crash was unbuckled, nine out of 10 of the passengers who died were also unbuckled. Remind your teen that it’s important to buckle up on every trip, every time, no matter what — front seat and back.
3. Distracted Driving: Cell phone use while driving is more than just risky — it can be deadly, and is outlawed in 47 states, Washington DC, Puerto Rico, Guam, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Remind your teen about the dangers of texting and using a phone while driving. Distracted driving isn’t limited to cell phone use; other passengers, audio and climate controls in the vehicle, and eating or drinking while driving are all examples of dangerous distractions for teen drivers. In 2018, among teen drivers of passenger vehicles involved in fatal crashes, 10% were reported as distracted at the time of the crash. Also remind your teen that headphones are not appropriate to wear while driving a vehicle, as they can distract a driver from hearing sirens, horns, or other important sounds.
4. Speed Limits: Speeding is a critical issue for all drivers, especially for teens. In 2018, more than one-quarter (28%) of all teen drivers of passenger vehicles involved in fatal crashes were speeding at the time of the crash, and males were more likely to be involved in fatal speeding-related crashes than females. Remind your teen to always drive within the speed limit.
5. Passengers: Passengers in a teen’s car can lead to disastrous consequences. Research shows that the risk of a fatal crash goes up dramatically in direct relation to the number of passengers in a car. The likelihood of teen drivers engaging in risky behavior triples when traveling with multiple passengers.
Parents can help protect their teen drivers by talking with them about these risks. Self-reported surveys show that teens whose parents set firm rules for driving typically engage in less risky driving behaviors and are involved in fewer crashes.
For more information about National Teen Driver Safety Week and to learn safe driving tips to share with your teens, visit www.nhtsa.gov/road-safety/teen-driving.

October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month

The Carlisle Police Department is a strong supporter against domestic violence and October is National Domestic Violence Awareness Month.
Here are a few statistics according to the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence:
• On average, nearly 20 people per minute are physically abused by an intimate partner in the United States. In one year, this equates to more than 10 million women and men.
• 1 in 4 women and 1 in 9 men experience severe intimate partner physical violence, intimate partner contact sexual violence, and/or intimate partner stalking with impacts such as injury, fearfulness, post-traumatic stress disorder, use of victim services, contraction of sexually transmitted diseases, etc.
• 1 in 3 women and 1 in 4 men have experienced some form of physical violence by an intimate partner. This includes a range of behaviors (e.g. slapping, shoving, pushing) and in some cases might not be considered “domestic violence.”
• 1 in 7 women and 1 in 25 men have been injured by an intimate partner.
• 1 in 10 women have been raped by an intimate partner.
• 1 in 4 women and 1 in 7 men have been victims of severe physical violence (e.g. beating, burning, strangling) by an intimate partner in their lifetime.
• 1 in 7 women and 1 in 18 men have been stalked by an intimate partner during their lifetime to the point in which they felt very fearful or believed that they or someone close to them would be harmed or killed.
• On a typical day, there are more than 20,000 phone calls placed to domestic violence hotlines nationwide.
• The presence of a gun in a domestic violence situation increases the risk of homicide by 500%.
• Intimate partner violence accounts for 15% of all violent crime.
• Women between the ages of 18-24 are most commonly abused by an intimate partner.
• 19% of domestic violence involves a weapon.
• Domestic victimization is correlated with a higher rate of depression and suicidal behavior.
• Only 34% of people who are injured by intimate partners receive medical care for their injuries.
If you are a victim of domestic violence, call 911, get in touch with an advocate, counselor or you may also contact the National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1 (800) 799-7233.

3rd Annual Pink Patch Campaign

The Carlisle Police Department, in conjunction with the Carlisle Police Officers Association, has launched our 3rd Annual Pink Patch Campaign. The Pink Patch Campaign is designed to encourage conversations within our community and to bring awareness in the early detection and fight against breast cancer.
During the month of October, CPD officers will have the option to replace their standard uniform patch with the pink breast cancer version.
With a contribution made by the Carlisle Police Officers Association, a limited supply of pink patches will again be available for purchase from now through the end of October. The generated funds raised will then be donated to the John Stoddard Cancer Center Compassion Fund. The Compassion Fund provides cancer patients and their families with support and resources beyond what the hospital is able to provide.
Patches are $10.00 each and may be picked up Monday- Friday 8:00 AM- 4:30 PM at the Carlisle Police Department. Cash and local checks are accepted. You may also Venmo- @CPOA-IA.
We hope that you will join us again in supporting this great cause!

Officer Burditt Receives Instructor Certifications

We have another instructor!

The Carlisle Police Department would like to recognize Officer Alex Burditt for receiving a Department Instructor Commendation for successfully completing his Taser Instructor Certification through the Iowa Law Enforcement Academy!

Officer Burditt is now able to conduct re-certification training for the police department during in-service trainings as well as able to train and re-certify officers from other law enforcement agencies and assist in training new police officer recruits at the Iowa Law Enforcement Academy. Please join us as we congratulate Officer Burditt with his accomplishment!

 

CPD’s Summer Fiss’ Tix Winner

Congratulations to Harry Cooper on being this year’s winner of the Carlisle Police Department’s Summer Fiss’ Tix program! As the winner, Harry received a voucher for a free bicycle from Street Collective! We would like to thank Tom Thiel and Fiss’ for their continued partnership of our program and Street Collective for supplying this year’s bicycle. #CarlisleIowaPD #SweetDeal #Sweetnewride #CPDFissTix

PD Instructor Certifications

Recognition Alert!

The Carlisle Police Department would like to recognize Officer Tyler Hahn for receiving a Department Instructor Commendation for successfully completing his Firearms Instructor Certification through the Iowa Law Enforcement Academy.

The Carlisle Police Department would like to recognize Officer Zach Buehrer for receiving a Department Instructor Commendation for successfully completing his Defensive Tactics Instructor Certification through the Iowa Law Enforcement Academy.

Both Officer Hahn and Officer Buehrer are now are able to conduct re-certification training for the police department during in-service training. Both officers are now able to train and re-certify officers from other law enforcement agencies and assist in training new recruits at the Iowa Law Enforcement Academy. Please join us as we congratulate Officer Hahn and Officer Buehrer with their accomplishments!

 

 

Illegally Passing School Buses

With school now back in full swing, the Carlisle Police Department would like to remind motorist of Iowa law as it pertains to the unlawful passing of a school bus.

UNLAWFUL PASSING OF A SCHOOL BUS
Iowa Code 321.372 Subsection 3(a) & (b)

3. a. The driver of a vehicle, including the driver of a vehicle operating on a private road or driveway, when meeting a school bus with flashing amber warning lamps shall reduce the vehicle’s speed to not more than twenty miles per hour, and shall bring the vehicle to a complete stop when the school bus stops and the stop signal arm is extended. The vehicle shall remain stopped until the stop signal arm is retracted after which time the driver may proceed with due caution.
b. The driver of a vehicle, including the driver of a vehicle operating on a private road or driveway, overtaking a school bus shall not pass a school bus when red or amber warning signal lights are flashing. The driver shall bring the vehicle to a complete stop no closer than fifteen feet from the school bus when it is stopped and the stop arm is extended, and the vehicle shall remain stopped until the stop arm is retracted and the school bus resumes motion.

Be sure to slow down, keep an extra eye out when school buses are stopped and share this post! #CarlisleIowaPD #stoponred #slowdownschoolsbackinsession

Slow Down! School’s Back in Session Campaign

Labor Day 2020 Media Release

Police Officer Anthony Palmer Recognized

 

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